• Users Online: 145
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
FROM THE EDITORíS DESK
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 227

Preparing a case series and integrating the clinical approach in scientific writing


Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission16-Oct-2021
Date of Decision17-Oct-2021
Date of Acceptance18-Oct-2021
Date of Web Publication29-Nov-2021

Correspondence Address:
Sharmila Banerjee Mukherjee
Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, Bangla Sahib Marg, New Delhi
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ipcares.ipcares_340_21

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Mukherjee SB. Preparing a case series and integrating the clinical approach in scientific writing. Indian Pediatr Case Rep 2021;1:227

How to cite this URL:
Mukherjee SB. Preparing a case series and integrating the clinical approach in scientific writing. Indian Pediatr Case Rep [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 20];1:227. Available from: http://www.ipcares.org/text.asp?2021/1/4/227/331388

It is hard to believe that a year has passed since the first issue was published. The Indian Pediatrics Case Reports Editorial team is now ready with the fourth issue of 2021. There are three dimensions that emerge from this one, and I would like to share them with you.

A discerning reader may appreciate the fact that we have a new addition to our table of contents; the case series. We have recently received quite a few submissions in this category. This may be because authors have become cognizant with the fact that the Medical Council of Indian guidelines (dated February 12, 2020) accept publication of case series as one of the criteria for faculty promotion (there has not been any update since its conversion to the National Medical Council). I would also like to hope that another reason is because our journal is becoming more popular, being read by more pediatricians, and attracting the interest of more budding or established authors. Following inquiries from our readers, we have added separate guidelines in the “Instructions to authors” (accessible on the webpage) to make it easier for them to write them more scientifically. The Editorial Board has also decided to give more weightage in publication to case series, provided there is something novel and interesting that emerges from the article.

It is that time of the year when there is an increase in allergies throughout India due to the seasonal change, and in Delhi, due to the annual escalation in pollution. I think it befitting that this issue carries two articles related to pediatric hypersensitivity; a case series on “Skin Prick Tests and Subcutaneous Immunotherapy” (from which I personally learnt a lot) and the news excerpts on “Uncommon allergic manifestations in children” (this has a common factor with one of the other case series. Let us see if you can figure it out!).

Last but not the least, I would like our readers to appreciate that our authors are painstakingly highlighting the clinical approach they used to establish diagnosis. Our reviewers, editorial board, and CARE guidelines insist on this. Simply giving a sketchy clinical history and examination, listing investigations, and enumerating differential diagnoses, is not enough. There are many questions that have to be resolved to make a case report meaningful and a learning experience to whoever reads it; What were the salient clinical clues on history and examination that indicated the course of investigation to take? What was the rationale underlying the work up that was planned? Why were some investigations done and others left out? What were the clinical points for or against that made the clinician include or exclude a diagnosis? There is a lot of to-and-fro communication between all concerned and the authors, until the line of clinical reasoning becomes clear to the reader.

In this issue, we have case reports that have outlined the approach to the following clinical scenarios: unexplained aggression and decline in school performance; refractory allergic rhinitis; neonatal onset of nephrotic syndrome; sudden unexplained neonatal collapse; dysmorphic neonates; unexplained neonatal encephalopathy; persistent neonatal hyperglycemia, recurrent epistaxis; unusual presentations of common conditions (adverse drug reactions, anemia in Dengue, and Mongolian spots) and inability to provide a specific diet in a metabolic disorder due to financial constraints. Case reports are ideal teaching–learning tools for clinicians. I hope you enjoy and learn from each one of them, as much as I have while organizing the contents.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed660    
    Printed26    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded138    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]